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English

The TAS English Program aims to instruct our students in the art of crafting written and oral responses to literature. Through the study of challenging and thought-provoking works, students learn to appreciate the richness of our literary traditions and to ponder the ethical, personal, and social issues that arise from the literature. As a 1-to-1 laptop school, we also use the newest educational technologies to enhance our students’ learning experiences.

In Grades 9 and 10, students choose between standard level and honors level courses. In Grades 11 and 12, students may select from over 10 electives, including AP, IB, honors, and standard level courses. Although the courses vary in rigor and curriculum, all of our students study works of literary merit from various genres by writers of different cultures, genders, and time periods. Students learn to craft arguments, to analyze the writers’ stylistic choices, and to grapple with the ambiguity and complexity inherent to literature.

Course Offerings 2019-2020

ENGLISH 9 (UENG01)

ENGLISH 9 (UENG01)

Required

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 9

Homework: Moderate

English 9 is designed to generate mature thinking about the short story, novel, drama, poetry and nonfiction, and about the student’s own writing, while investigating the theme of adolescent self-discovery. The journey from innocence to experience forms the basis for English 9 literary selections. Students will work to develop effective study skills, enrich their vocabulary, gain proficiency in grammar, generate probing questions, develop research skills, learn and apply literary terms, and improve their writing. Students will receive a series of in-class and process-driven writing assignments. Also, students will have the opportunity to share their ideas and perceptions through small and large group discussions and through oral presentations. The course work culminates in semester exams in which students analyze the characters and issues that they have encountered in their reading.

Texts may include: Homer/Lombardo, The Odyssey; Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye; Golding, The Lord of the Flies, Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet; short non-fiction narratives; a teacher-selected unit on poetry.

HONORS ENGLISH 9 (UENG01H)

 

HONORS ENGLISH 9 (UENG01H)

Required

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 9

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required.

Through the study of personal essays, poetry, drama, and novels, Honors English 9 explores what it means to come of age, to have a voice, and to have agency. We ask, and attempt to answer, what it means to grow up and to read the world critically. As a foundational English course, Honors English 9 focuses on analytical writing, reading, and speaking. Close reading and passage analysis constitute the main focus for the fall semester; in the spring, students build on those skills to tackle more complex texts like Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet and Austen’s Northanger Abbey. The course is also focused on class discussions and student run seminars. Assessments take the form of timed writing, processed essays, and presentations, providing students with a variety of ways to demonstrate their learning. Honors English 9 requires maturity and initiative; homework load may be significant due to the difficulty of the texts assigned.

 

 

Texts may include the following: Homer/Lombardo, The Odyssey; Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet; Austen, Northanger Abbey; Cisneros, The House on Mango Street; selection of non-fiction and poetry

ENGLISH 10 (UENG02)

 

ENGLISH 10 (UENG02)

Required

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 10

Homework: Moderate

English 10 develops essential critical thinking and language skills. The course is built upon the premise that language has power, and students will analyze how language is used as an effective and powerful tool in three important areas: reading, writing, and speaking. Literature will focus on characters and narrators that are forced to face personal or sociopolitical issues. Students will express their ideas in argument-driven, analytic essays as well as class discussions.

Texts may include: Orwell, Animal Farm; Sophocles, Oedipus Rex; Shakespeare, Macbeth; Douglass, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; selection of Gothic short stories and poetry.

HONORS ENGLISH 10 (UENG03)

 

HONORS ENGLISH 10 (UENG03)

Required

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 10

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required.

Honors English 10 is a foundational course that builds on the students’ prior skillsets while also preparing them for future upper level courses. As such, emphasis is placed on argumentation and discernment in choosing evidence not only for written assessments but also oral presentations. Critical reading literacy in a variety of genres is a major component of the course to prepare students to showcase mastery of synthesizing higher order ideas across texts and disciplines. Students should also be able to demonstrate greater independent initiative when handling texts and when expressing ideas in class discussions. Texts for the Honors English 10 course, organized by genre, explore the extent to which language can be used in powerful ways to persuade us, to move us, and to aid us in instituting social change.

 

Texts may include: Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four; Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist; Shakespeare, Othello; Chang, Hunger; Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION (UENG13)

 

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION (UENG13)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11-12

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required.

In this course students will have the opportunity to engage in a close study of a variety of works. Students in AP English Language will become critical readers and skilled writers who are able to identify and explicate the rhetorical devices and purposes through which selected texts are written. One of the many goals of this college-level course is to prepare students to write effectively and compellingly about topics across all disciplines, a practice in which they will regularly engage, in both the university and professional contexts. In May, all students will take the AP Language and Composition Exam.

 

Texts may include: Thoreau, Walden; Alexander, The New Jim Crow; selected essays and speeches.

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION (UENG23)

 

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION (UENG23)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 12

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: AP Language & Composition, IBHL Year 1, or permission of the Department Chair

This course is a university-level seminar that explores important themes in literature in an inter-textual context. Reading, critical thinking, seminar discussion, and writing are the essential elements of the course. The reading load is significantly heavier than other courses with an Honors weighting and will also include selections from works of critical theory. The class is for mature readers with open minds who have already demonstrated excellence in writing and critical thinking and who are eager to challenge themselves further. In May, all students will take the AP English Literature and Composition Exam.

Texts may include: Shakespeare, Hamlet; Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Achebe, Things Fall Apart; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; Miller, Death of a Salesman; Williams, The Glass Menagerie; Kogawa, Obasan; Desai, The Inheritance of Loss; Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita, Brontë, Jane Eyre.

IBHL ENGLISH YEAR ONE (UENG14) YEAR TWO (UENG24)

 

IBHL ENGLISH

YEAR ONE (UENG14)

YEAR TWO (UENG24)

Elective

Duration: 2 years

Credit: 2

Grade: 11-12

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required.

IBHL English Literature is primarily a rigorous pre-university course in literature. It is designed for students who intend to pursue a course of studies at university that places a heavy emphasis on critical reading and analytical writing. As the International Baccalaureate Organization notes, the study of literature “enables an exploration of one of the more enduring fields of human creativity and artistic ingenuity, and provides immense opportunities for encouraging independent, original, critical and clear thinking. It also promotes a healthy respect for the imagination and a perceptive approach to the understanding and interpretation of literary works. The discussion of literature is itself an art which requires the clear expression of ideas both orally and in writing. The Language A1 program encourages students to see literary works as products of art and their authors as craftsmen whose methods of production can be analyzed in a variety of ways and on a number of levels. This is achieved through the emphasis placed on exploring the means used by different authors to convey their subjects in the works studied. It is further reinforced by the comparative framework emphasized for the study of these works in all parts of the program. The flexibility of the program allows teachers to choose challenging works from their own sources to suit the particular needs and interests of their students.” During the course of two years, students will be assessed in a variety of written and oral formats.

 

Texts may include: Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; Garcia Marquez, Chronicle of a Death Foretold; O’ Neill; Long Day’s Journey into Night; Schlink, The Reader; Dillard, Teaching a Stone to Talk; selected poems by Emily Dickinson and other poets.

 

IBSL ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 1 (UENG16)
LITERATURE & MEDIA STUDIES 1 (UENG160)
IBSL ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 2 (UENG26)
LITERATURE & MEDIA STUDIES 2 (UENG260)

Elective

Duration: 2 years

Credit: 2

Grades: 11 & 12

Homework: Moderate

Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation is required for students taking the IBSL option only. No prerequisite for students taking Literature & Media Studies.

(IBSL option available to IB diploma candidates only, who will proceed
to IBSL English Language & Literature 2 (UENG 26) in 2019-2020. Homework for those taking the IBSL option is Heavy. This is the first year of a two-year course; beginning with the class of 2020 it will be replacing IBSL English Literature.)

This course aims to develop skills of textual analysis of both literary and non-literary texts. Students will be encouraged to question the meaning generated by language and texts, based on both content and context. The course will examine ways in which authors use formal elements to create meaning in a text combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception. Students will write and create presentations in response to texts both analytically and creatively. Helping students to focus closely on the language of studied texts and to become aware of the role of wider context in shaping meaning is central to the course. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB Diploma Program students because it contributes to a global perspective. In addition to traditional works of literature, texts will be taken from a variety of sources, genres and media.

AMERICAN LITERATURE (UENG04)

 

AMERICAN LITERATURE (UENG04)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11-12

Homework: Moderate

Students will apply the reading and writing skills developed in the first two years of the English program to a representative study of American literature. The course syllabus will emphasize works that have earned a place in the literary tradition of the United States, while also including more recent writers whose works are expanding and redefining the American literary tradition. Instruction will be designed to help students respond to increasingly complex and challenging literary experiences. The composition component of the curriculum will include a heavy emphasis on journaling and practice in a wide range of writing modes. Work in practical grammar, style, and vocabulary development will continue.

Texts may include: Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Otsuka, When the Emperor Was Divine; O’Brien, The Things They Carried; Capote, In Cold Blood; Coates, Between the World and Me.

WORLD LITERATURE (UENG05)

 

WORLD LITERATURE (UENG05)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11-12

Homework: Moderate

World Literature explores the interplay of class, gender, and race across cultures and time. Through the study of great works of Western and non-Western literature, students will gain greater perspective on their unique place within this rapidly globalizing world. This class promotes an understanding of the works in their cultural/historical contexts as well as the enduring values that unite humanity. This course is designed to challenge students as critical readers, writers, and thinkers.

Texts may include: Euripides, Medea; Su, Raise the Red Lantern; Esquivel, Like Water for Chocolate; Shakespeare, Othello; selected essays, poems and short stories.

LITERATURE, JUSTICE, & LAW (UENG07)

Elective Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1 Grade: 11-12

Homework: Moderate

What lessons can be learned about law and justice, vengeance and mercy from great literature? How does literature depict the legal and judicial system? This course focuses on the execution of justice within literature. We will seek to discover the ways in which literature enhances our understanding of morals, ethics, and justice. Participants will analyze legal themes in literary texts in order to better understand the tension between the laws we follow and our own code of ethics. Participants will also engagein a variety of immersive activities such as debates, mock trials, and actit-outs. The class will be formatted around open-ended discussions, case examination, as well as reflective and analytical writing.

 

Texts may include: Kafka, The Trial; Sophocles, Antigone; Larsen, Devil in the White City; Shakespeare, Titus Andronics; Camus, The Stranger; Daoud & Cullen, The Mersault Investigation

HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE (UENG04H)

 

HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE (UENG04H)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11-12

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required.

Honors American Literature will require a rigorous study of a representative sample of American literature with an emphasis on developing students’ critical reading and analytical writing skills. Students are expected to demonstrate independent initiative when handling texts and when expressing ideas in class discussions as well as in frequent in-class and take-home writing assignments. Reading load and homework expectations in the Honors class are significantly higher. The course syllabus will reflect works that have earned a place in the literary tradition of the United States, while also including more recent writers whose works are expanding and redefining the American literary tradition. Instruction will be designed to help students respond to increasingly complex and challenging literary experiences. The composition component of the curriculum will include practice in a wide range of writing modes. Work in practical grammar, style, and vocabulary development will continue. Teacher recommendation is required.

 

Texts may include: Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; O’Brien, The Things They Carried; Silko, Ceremony; Otsuka, When the Emperor Was Divine; Coates, Between the World and Me; selections of poetry provided by the instructor.

HONORS WORLD LITERATURE (UENG05H)

HONORS WORLD LITERATURE (UENG05H)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11-12

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required.

Honors World Literature requires a rigorous study of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of classical Western and non-Western literary traditions, as well as a greater mastery of critical reading, thinking, and writing. Students should demonstrate greater independent initiative when handling texts and when expressing ideas in class discussions as well as in frequent in-class and take-home writing assignments. Reading load and homework expectations in the Honors class are significantly higher. The works studied in the course will be examined through the lens of different literary theories. An important goal of the class is to promote an understanding of the works in their cultural/ historical contexts and to reveal the enduring human values which unite the different literary traditions.

Texts may include: Sin-Leqi-Unninni, Gilgamesh; Virgil, Aeneid; Heaney, Beowulf (trans.); Cervantes, Don Quixote; Achebe, Things Fall Apart; Euripides, Medea; Ibsen, A Doll’s House; Narayan, The Guide; Marquez, Chronicle of a Death Foretold; She, Rickshaw Boy; and selected essays, poems and short stories.

HONORS SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (UENG06H)

HONORS SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE (UENG06H)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11 only

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: Teacher approval is required.

This seminar is for juniors who have a passion for literature and literary study and who want the challenge of a university-level course with university-level expectations. See AP English Literature and Composition for the course description; juniors will be placed with the AP students (seniors) but will not be expected to take the AP exam. This class is for mature readers with open minds. Students in this course receive honors credit.

HONORS CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (UENG54H)

HONORS CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (UENG54H)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11-12

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required.

Honors Contemporary Literature will require a rigorous study of a range of contemporary works (20th and 21st c.), from modern novels, poetry and plays to contemporary essays, memoirs and creative non-fiction, with an emphasis on developing critical reading, analytical writing, and discussion skills. We will consider works of fiction and non-fiction that challenge the norms of traditional form and structure, and that challenge societal and ideological norms. We will examine the texts from multiple viewpoints, examining the works not only for themes, narratives, and style, but also through application of a variety of critical literary and social science theories. A central focus will be to examine how these works attempt to decipher who we are today, and to look at how authors address the current zeitgeist through their texts. This will be a non-traditional literature class, in that we will move away from primarily literary analysis to contextual consideration and expository self-reflection. Students can expect to do some light cultural research and read some literary criticism. Class will be conducted primarily through daily Socratic seminar-based discussion, and weekly analytical and reflective writing tasks. Reading load and homework considerations in the Honors class are significantly higher, and teacher recommendation is required.

Texts may include works by: Malcolm Gladwell, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, Truman Capote, Denise Levertov, Carol Ann Duffy, Rainer Maria Rilke, John Hersey, Frank McCourt, David Foster Wallace, Michael Chabon, David Sedaris, Jon Krakauer, Jared Diamond, Thomas Friedman, Samuel Beckett, Harvey Pekar, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

EXPOSITORY WRITING 1 (SEM. 1) (UENG81S1)
EXPOSITORY WRITING 1 (SEM. 2) (UENG81S2)
EXPOSITORY WRITING 2 (SEM. 1) (UENG82S1)
EXPOSITORY WRITING 2 (SEM. 2) (UENG82S2)

Elective Duration: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 Grade: 9-12

Homework: None Prerequisite: None for Expository Writing 1 Subsequent courses to be taken in sequence.

Expository Writing 1, 2, 3, and 4 provide students with individualized writing instruction that supplements the work done in the standard English curriculum and offers students the opportunity to engage in sustained creative work in English. This course has no assigned homework; all work is done in class. Each class focuses on individual production of written work and begins with a directed lesson on an aspect of writing, revision, the writing process or the project at hand. Writing projects vary in length and explore a range of genres, including both analytical and creative work. Students spend most classes writing on topics of their own choosing and conferring individually with the teacher. Students may choose to take the course for a grade or on a Pass/Fail basis.

 

EXPOSITORY WRITING 3 (SEM. 1) (UENG83S1)
EXPOSITORY WRITING 3 (SEM. 2) (UENG83S2)
EXPOSITORY WRITING 4 (SEM. 1) (UENG84S1)
EXPOSITORY WRITING 4 (SEM. 2) (UENG84S2)

Elective Duration: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 Grade: 9-12

Homework: None Prerequisite: None for Expository Writing 1 Subsequent courses to be taken in sequence.

Expository Writing 1, 2, 3, and 4 provide students with individualized writing instruction that supplements the work done in the standard English curriculum and offers students the opportunity to engage in sustained creative work in English. This course has no assigned homework; all work is done in class. Each class focuses on individual production of written work and begins with a directed lesson on an aspect of writing, revision, the writing process or the project at hand. Writing projects vary in length and explore a range of genres, including both analytical and creative work. Students spend most classes writing on topics of their own choosing and conferring individually with the teacher. Students may choose to take the course for a grade or on a Pass/Fail basis.

JOURNALISM 1: THE BLUE & GOLD (UENG 71)
HONORS JOURNALISM 2: THE BLUE & GOLD (UENG 72H)
HONORS JOURNALISM 3: THE BLUE & GOLD (UENG 73H)
HONORS JOURNALISM 4: THE BLUE & GOLD (UENG 74H)

 

Elective

Duration: Full year

Credit: 1

Grade: 9-12

Homework: Heavy

Prerequisite: None for Honors Journalism I.

Subsequent courses to be taken in sequence.

Journalism is primarily a news production course. Students are encouraged to take the course in multiple years and, as a result, will earn honors course credit for every year after the initial year of enrollment. The majority of class time is spent creating the award-winning school newspaper, the Blue & Gold. Through the production of the newspaper, students will learn how to write across all genres of news including hard news, editorials, features, reviews, and sports writing. They will also learn about photojournalism, news design, infographic creation, writing in AP style, and how to use social media to engage a publication’s audience. Students are expected to work independently and to collaborate in small groups on all stages of the newspaper and website production. Ability to work as part of a team, to show initiative and leadership, to manage time effectively and to meet deadlines are important skills for students taking this course. The Blue & Gold editorial responsibilities are given to students who show exemplary expertise, commitment, and leadership. Students and parents should be aware that students who take this course are expected to spend extra time at school; students must devote several evenings and Saturdays over the course of the year to the design and production of the award-winning Blue & Gold. Students will leave the class with a large portfolio of published articles, photos, and designs, a refined ability to work on a team, and a deep appreciation for the media’s role in a community.

Required Texts: Kovach and Rosenstiel, The Elements of Journalism

HONORS WRITING WORKSHOP & SEMINAR 1 (UENG 61H)
WRITING WORKSHOP & SEMINAR 1 (UENG 61)
HONORS WRITING WORKSHOP & SEMINAR 2 (UENG62H)
HONORS WRITING WORKSHOP & SEMINAR 2 (UENG62H)

Elective
Duration: Full year
Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12
Homework: Moderate (Heavy for Honors)
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required for Honors.
Subsequent courses to be taken in sequence
 
In this course, students will be immersed in a rigorous workshop where they are required to produce and revise writing, with the intent of submitting the works that they create to competitions, publications, and literary journals. This course is designed for students who already engage in a regular writing process in any genre and can demonstrate a passion for creative writing with their own creative work. As members of a college level workshop, students will develop both the skills and sensitivity necessary to give/receive feedback to/from their peers, and hold each other accountable to shared progress in the process of sustained revisions. Through these discussions, our goal is to first identify and subsequently refine our own habits that shape our choices and abilities as writers. This class will encourage students to see literary works as products of art and their authors as crafters whose methods of production can be analyzed in a variety of contexts and purposes. Assessments will include: the creation of a portfolio of work, a critical essay in which students must conduct research (on authors, their manifestos, literary theory) to support their own writing practices, and regular self-reflections.

 

HONORS POETRY SEMINAR & WORKSHOP (SEM. 1) (UENG661H)
POETRY SEMINAR & WORKSHOP (SEM. 1) (UENG661)
HONORS POETRY SEMINAR & WORKSHOP (SEM. 2) (UENG662H)
POETRY SEMINAR & WORKSHOP (SEM. 2) (UENG662)

Elective

Duration: 1 semester or 1 year

Credit: 0.5 or 1 Grade: 9-12

Homework: Moderate (Moderate to Heavy for Honors) Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required for Honors.

Students may take this course either of both semesters. What is poetry? Why is poetry important? What is the role of poetry in dissent? In ecstasy? In grief? This course examines the ways in which poetry has functioned as testimony in human history, as witness to private grief, as challenge to narratives of power, as reclamation of lost voices. We will look at how poetry bridges the ancient and the contemporary, examining ways in which archetypal figures and conflicts are re-imagined and re-tooled to comment on contemporary conflicts. There will be an examination of how form shapes meaning and how meaning shapes form. Forms examined will include but not be limited to: sonnets, ghazals, sestinas, villanelles, documentary poetry, poetry sequences, and prose poetry. The course will also focus on creative expression, using the poems read in class as inspiration. Homework will entail reading, certainly of the poems studied, but also relating to context, history, and biography. Writing will primarily include personal response and creative response.

ART & LITERATURE (SEM. 1) (UART65S1)

Elective

Duration: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 Grade: 9-12

Homework: Light Prerequisite: None

This course is dual-listed under both the English and Visual Art departments and fulfills the Visual Art credit but does not fulfill the English credit. The course is designed for students to explore in greater depth the collaborative potential for visual art and literature, providing them the platform to appreciate the interconnectedness of the world of words and the world of colors. Students will express their appreciation for and understanding of literature in their artistic interpretations. They will learn and experiment with a variety of tools, mediums, and techniques such as drawing, painting, and mixed media as we read and discuss different genres of literature, with a focus on poetry and prose. We will examine the texts for themes, symbolism, imagery, characterization, narrative perspective and structure, and learn to use visual art as a tool to communicate our interpretation of these authorial choices. In the course of the semester, students will also examine works of art and interpret the story behind these artworks through individual and collaborative creative writing. Students are assigned readings for homework, and are expected to record their observations and ideas in their sketchbook so that they are prepared to come into class to share and discuss. Most assignments are completed in class, though they might need to work on their art and/or creative writing pieces beyond regular class time. At the end of the semester, students will develop a body of work and produce a final portfolio along with written reflections of their creative choices.

 

ART & LITERATURE (SEM. 2) (UART65S2)

Elective

Duration: 1 semester

Credit: 0.5 Grade: 9-12

Homework: Light Prerequisite: None

This course is dual-listed under both the English and Visual Art departments and fulfills the Visual Art credit but does not fulfill the English credit. Students can take this course without having taken it in the first semester. Course content, expectations, and outcomes are similar to that of the first semester. Students will explore the collaborative potential for visual art and literature, and are provided the platform to appreciate the interconnectedness of the world of words and the world of colors in their artistic interpretations. They will learn and experiment with a variety of tools, mediums, and techniques such as drawing, painting, and mixed media as we read and discuss different genres of literature, with a focus on poetry, prose and plays. We will examine the texts for themes, symbolism, imagery, characterization, narrative perspective and structure, and learn to use visual art as a tool to communicate our interpretation of these authorial choices. In the course of the semester, students will also examine works of art and interpret the story behind these artworks through creative writing. Students are assigned readings for homework, and are expected to record their observations and ideas in their sketchbook so that they are prepared to come into class to share and discuss. Most assignments are completed in class, though they might need to work on their art and/or creative writing pieces beyond regular class time. At the end of the semester, students will develop a body of work and produce a final portfolio along with written reflections of their creative choices.

 

HONORS ART & LITERATURE (UART65H)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1 Grade: 10-12

Homework: Moderate to Heavy

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required

This course is dual-listed under both the English and Visual Art departments and fulfills the Visual Art credit but does not fulfill the English credit. At the Honors level, workload and expectations are higher; it is likely that students will need to work on their art/creative writing pieces beyond regular class time. Throughout the year, students develop their oral, written and visual presentations skills as they visually interpret the literature and creatively write about the art. They are exposed to a variety of tools, mediums, and techniques as we read and interpret different literary genres such as poetry, prose and plays. Students are assigned readings for homework, and are expected to record their observations and ideas in their sketchbook so that they are prepared to come into class to share and discuss. We will engage in individual and collaborative work in our conceptualization and execution of art making during class time. In the second semester, students work towards developing a personalized portfolio by focusing on a theme, medium, or literary genre of their choosing. By the end of both semesters, students are expected to have a portfolio of work that they can select from to submit to the Scholastic Art Awards and the school magazines. The course will also conclude with student exhibitions as they “read”, reflect and interpret the aesthetics of each other’s works of art.

Department Chair

US English Paths

Course flow chart