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History & Social Studies

At TAS, the focus of the History and Social Studies Department is to create historically knowledgeable, analytical individuals who have an understanding of their place in the world. TAS has three requirements for graduation; in 9th grade: Asian History; in 10th grade: European History; and in 11th grade: United States History. Beyond these we offer a number of courses in history, psychology, economics, business, and entrepreneurship for students interested in expanding their knowledge in the social sciences.

Course Offerings 2019-2020

HISTORY OF ASIA (USST011)

HISTORY OF ASIA (USST011)

Required

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 9

Homework: Moderate

This course presents students with an overview of Asian society through the examination of its culture, history, and geography. This course will follow a chronological path with a focus on regions such as East Asia, Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and the Pacific Rim. Students should expect to be engaged in the following activities throughout the year: writing in various styles, reading a multitude of perspectives, refining research skills, debating controversial issues, reenacting key historical moments through simulations, annotating and actively reading primary and secondary documents, watching and analyzing documentaries and films, and writing a persuasive research essay.

AP WORLD HISTORY (USST012)

AP WORLD HISTORY (USST012)

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 9-12

*Satisfies Asian History requirement

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: 9th grade students: 8th grade history teacher recommendation and concurrent enrollment in Honors English 9. 10-12th grade students: concurrent enrollment in or completion of AP History course, or History and Social Studies Department recommendation.

Homework: Heavy

AP World History is offered to a limited number of selected 9th graders, as well as interested 11th-12th graders. Only students who are disciplined, motivated and committed to reading advanced level history should consider taking this course.

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and interaction between different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature and patterns of the changes in global communities along with their causes and effects by examining five broad historical time periods from 8000 B.C.E. to the present. Students are required to take the external AP exam in May.

HISTORY OF EUROPE (USST022)

HISTORY OF EUROPE (USST022)

Required

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 10

Homework: Moderate

How did the Western world come to be the way it is? How did Western ideas and tradition develop?” The 10th Grade History of Europe program is constructed around the development of essential critical thinking within a chronological study of Europe since 800 CE. Students interact with and write about a variety of texts from the areas of history, literature, fine arts, and philosophy in the Western tradition. Students will explore various key themes of history in the context of the growth of the major European powers. Assessment is based on unit tests, written assignments, oral presentations and formal research papers.

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (USST04)

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (USST04)

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 10-12

*Satisfies European History requirement

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP History course, or concurrent enrollment in Honors English 10, or History and Social Studies Department recommendation.

Homework: Heavy

The Advanced Placement European History program provides students with the analytic skills and content knowledge necessary to deal critically with the interpretive problems of European societies. The course encompasses the social, political, economic, religious, technological, intellectual, and cultural developments of European society from 1450 to the present. The primary aim of the course is to present a history of European societies, institutions and ideals based upon a close reading of secondary source materials and analysis of primary documents. Students are required to take the external AP exam in May.

UNITED STATES HISTORY (USST03)

UNITED STATES HISTORY (USST03)

Required

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11

Homework: Moderate

Who was in America before the Europeans came? How did America become America? How does that history shape and impact our future? What role do the people play in the development of the nation? These questions and more are answered in U.S. History, a thematic study of United States History. The year begins with the development of colonies, the quest for independence, forming of the new nation and its efforts to redefine that identity after the Civil War. Second semester covers the development of the United States as a global superpower through World Wars I and II, the turbulence of the Cold War era and the quest for minority equality from the Civil Rights movement to Barack Obama’s historic election ins 2008. Students are assessed based on written work, various oral presentations or projects, daily discussions and a year-long research paper.

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (USST06)

 

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (USST06)

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11

*Satisfies US History requirement

Prerequisite: Completion of an AP History course or History and Social Studies Department recommendation.

Homework: Heavy

The Advanced Placement US History program is designed to be a rigorous fast-paced course that explores in-depth the major events in American History from the Pre-Columbian Era to the 21st Century with a focus on historical thinking skills. AP US History students use primary and secondary sources to learn about, critically analyze, and develop historical understanding of the major, social, political, cultural and economic movements and events of American history. This class requires that students read widely and carry out individual and small group research projects. As well as write an indepth analytical research essay. Students are required to take the external AP exam in May.

IB HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (USST19)

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11

*Satisfies U.S. History requirement

Prerequisite: IB Diploma Student or History and Social Studies Department recommendation.

Homework: Heavy

This course is designed to teach students about important thematic topics in American history and develop skills to comprehend, evaluate, and critically analyze both the past and present. Students will study the founding of the USA, slavery, the causes of the civil war and the reasons the Union won the war, the Reconstruction Era, and the 20th century Civil Rights Movement. Heavy emphasis is placed on understanding the perspectives of historians and on writing persuasive essays that will prepare students for college-level writing expectations. Students will also complete a major research essay as part of the curriculum.

IBSL 20th CENTURY WORLD HISTORY (USST211) / IBHL HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS YEAR 2 (USST222)

 

IBSL 20th CENTURY WORLD HISTORY (USST211)

IBHL HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS YEAR 2 (USST222)

 

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of History of the Americas or IB Diploma Student or History and Social Studies Department recommendation.

 

Homework: Heavy

The course is designed to teach students about the major events of the 20th century and develop skills to comprehend, evaluate, and critically analyze both the past and present. This course examines major themes of twentieth century world history: the rise and rule of authoritarian states; the rise of the Cold War, its critical crises, and its end; and the comparison of protest movements in different areas of the world. Heavy emphasis is placed on understanding the perspectives of historians and on writing persuasive essays that will prepare students for college-level writing expectations. Students will complete a major research essay and are expected to take the corresponding external IB exam in May.

BIG HISTORY (USST08) / HONORS BIG HISTORY (USST08H)

 

BIG HISTORY (USST08)

HONORS BIG HISTORY (USST08H)

 

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11-12

Prerequisite: None

Homework: Light (Moderate for Honors)

This is not the normal history course. It is an interdisciplinary study of change over time from the Big Bang to the future.

This course is a history of people and their place in the universe. In the course student look at the past from the Big Bang to modernity out common themes and patterns that can help us better understand people, civilizations, and the world we live in. The course is driven by the following questions: Where did we come from? What causes change? Where are we heading? Students choosing the honors option will have additional readings and a discussion board that they will be required to respond to each week of the course.

HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT GREEK PEOPLE (UCLS101)

HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT GREEK PEOPLE (UCLS101)

Duration: 1 semester, offered in Semester I only

Credit: 0.5

Grade: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Homework: Light

An introduction to the history of the ancient Greek world to the end of the Hellenistic Period, this course is based on reading ancient authors and documents in translation. Examining ancient artifacts, including architecture and infrastructure, and tracing the cultural and artistic development of Greek civilization. The focus of the course is on examining the emergence and development of a Panhellenic Greek cultural identity. In addition, students will study the history of Mediterranean archaeology and learn about the most recent developments in that field as they pertain to the ancient Greek peoples.

HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT ROMAN PEOPLE (UCLS102)

 

HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT ROMAN PEOPLE (UCLS102)

Duration: 1 semester, offered in Semester 2 only

Credit: 0.5

Grade: 9-12

Prerequisite: None

Homework: Light

 

An introduction to the history of the ancient Roman world to the age of Constantine, this course is based on reading ancient authors and documents in translation, examining ancient artifacts, including architecture and infrastructure, and tracing the cultural and artistic development of Roman civilization. The focus of the course is on the problems that attended the development and spread of a shared Roman cultural identity in the disparate places that were governed from Rome. In addition, students study the history of Mediterranean archaeology and learn about the most recent developments in that field as they pertain to the history of Rome.

ECONOMICS (USST05R)

ECONOMICS (USST05R)

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 12

Prerequisite: None

Homework: Medium

This course covers Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and International Economics, including the decision-making of companies, international trade, exchange rates, and current world-wide economic events. Students will participate in a business case study from Harvard Business School that applies principles learned in the course to a real-life business.

AP ECONOMICS (USST11)

 

AP ECONOMICS (USST11)

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 11-12

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of an AP History/AP Cal AB or BC.

Homework: Heavy

This course covers Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and International Economics, including the decision-making of companies, international trade, exchange rates, and current world-wide economic events. Students will participate in a business case study from Harvard Business School that applies principles learned in the course to a real-life business. Students will be prepared to take the AP Micro and Macro Exams in May.

AP HISTORY OF ART (UART32)

AP ART HISTORY (UART32)

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 10-12

Prerequisite: None

Homework: Heavy

 

The AP History of Art course is designed to provide high school students with the same opportunities provided in college. These opportunities include an understanding and enjoyment of architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms within historical and cultural contexts. Students will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past to the present, from a variety of cultures. While it is fascinating to follow the development of an artist or a movement, it is far more engaging, challenging and rewarding to survey human creativity as it spans history. Students should be able to read and write at a mature proficiency level.

SEMINAR: HISTORY OF MINORITIES IN AMERICA (USST07) / HONORS SEMINAR: HISTORY OF MINORITIES IN AMERICA (USST07H)

SEMINAR: HISTORY OF MINORITIES IN AMERICA (USST07)

HONORS SEMINAR: HISTORY OF MINORITIES IN AMERICA (USST07H)

Elective Duration: 1 year Credit: 1

Grade: 12

Prerequisite: Completion of U.S. History or its equivalent.

Homework: Light (Light to Moderate for Honors)

While both U.S. History and A.P. U.S. History cover some aspects of how American history has treated and impacted minorities, neither of those courses provide the time for teachers and students to engage with the subject in-depth. This class examines the history of minorities—women, African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, Native Americans, and the LGBTQ community—from their perspective as opposed to the white male perspective. Instead of focusing on how the forming of America and the writing of our history has impacted these groups, students examine how these groups have impacted the forming of America, the writing of our collective history, and the impact on current events in the U.S.

SEMINAR: WORLD RELIGIONS (USST09) / HONORS SEMINAR: WORLD RELIGIONS (USST09H) / IBSL WORLD RELIGIONS (USST091)

SEMINAR: WORLD RELIGIONS (USST09)


HONORS SEMINAR: WORLD RELIGIONS (USST09H)


IBSL WORLD RELIGIONS (USST091)

 

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 10-12 (11-12 for IBSL)

Prerequisite: None

Homework: Light (Moderate for Honors and IBSL)

For individuals to navigate and positively impact today’s multicultural world, one needs a deeper and meaningful understanding of the world’s major religions. In this course students will explore beliefs, practices and modern debates around the major religions of Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, and Christianity. We will also explore a variety of belief systems, such as Native American Sioux, Haitian Vodun, Wiccan Goddess, and Taiwan Ami. Honors students have the opportunity to research any topic related to religion or philosophy such as Eastern Medicine, yoga, atheism, etc. Through this class students will learn about different religions and philosophies, experience some of their practices through activities, guests, and field trips, and ultimately debate current issues around these topics. Students who chose to take the IBSL World Religions option are required to complete an investigative study and take the IB exam in May.

HONORS SEMINAR: CURRENT ISSUES IN USA (USST10)

HONORS SEMINAR: CURRENT ISSUES IN USA (USST10)

Elective

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grade: 12

Prerequisite: Completion of U.S. History or its equivalent.

Homework: Moderate to Heavy

The intent of this course is to provide students with the basic background and foundational information to help them understand current issues in the United States. Students, with the instructor’s guidance, will select a list of topics which would possibly include; the environment, sexual harassment, the prison system, rights of minority groups, affirmative action in college admissions, and the growing gap between the rich and poor, to examine in depth. Students will utilize a variety of news sources including; the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Economist, and CNN as well as others, to examine a variety of viewpoints pertaining to the topics they choose. A major goal of the class would be to expose students to various perspectives different groups hold in the United States. There will be a major focus on researching and writing a paper describing an important issue in contemporary America and presenting the reasons for its being controversial.

BUSINESS & ENTREPRENEURSHIP (USST513)

BUSINESS & ENTREPRENEURSHIP (USST513)

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grades: 9-12

Pre-requisite: None

Homework: Light

Advancing in today’s competitive and continually changing environment requires business insight. This course equips students with the fundamental business and entrepreneurial rinciples that allow them to navigate the business landscape of today and the future. Divided into five separate modules, this course covers: basic economic theory, business structure and organization, the role of marketing in developing business strategy, accounting and finance, and entrepreneurship. Students are introduced to the concepts through discussions of the textbook reading and observations of current events, and deepen their comprehension by applying the principles to case studies and simulations. This course further develops students’ critical thinking skills as they analyze and resolve real-world business issues. This survey course is good for students with an interest in business, entrepreneurship, and economics who may not be ready or have time for the college level AP Economics course.

Text: Business: A Changing World, 8th Edition (McGraw Hill)

MARKETING (USST53) / HONORS MARKETING (USST53H)

MARKETING (USST53)

HONORS MARKETING (USST53H)

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grades: 10-12

Pre-requisite: None

Homework: Light (Moderate for Honors)

Marketing goes beyond just advertising – it involves understanding how changing customer perceptions and preferences become central determinants of an organization’s strategy and long-run success. This course introduces students to fundamental principles and analyses involved with managing marketing activities, as well as to methods used to assess and solve marketing issues. Study modules include: determining marketing strategy, identifying trends in the marketplace, customer behavior and market segmentation, market research, product management, pricing, channels of distribution, and the promotional mix. Students learn concepts through classroom discussions of textbook reading and current events, and deepen their understanding through case studies, group projects, and a marketing simulation program developed by an INSEAD marketing professor. Students also complete and present a research-based marketing plan for a company of their choice.

Honors students read additional books to extend their knowledge and comprehension of marketing topics covered. This course is good for students who have an interest in business and economics who may not be ready or have time for the college level AP Economics course.

Text: Marketing, 11th Edition (McGraw Hill)

Additional Text for Honors: Contagious (by Jonah Berger) and Power Branding (by Steve McKee)

HONORS ACCOUNTING (USST52H)

 

HONORS ACCOUNTING (USST52H)

 

Duration: 1 year

Credit: 1

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Completion of at least one business course: Business & Entrepreneurship, Marketing/Honors Marketing, Economics or AP Economics or department permission.

Homework: Moderate

Accounting is the language of business and financial statements are used by investors and managers to help make crucial decisions. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts and standards fundamental to financial accounting systems. Important concepts including revenue recognition, inventory and cost of goods sold, long-lived assets, and long-term liabilities will be explored in detail. Emphasis will be given to understanding the organization and construction of basic financial accounting statements -- the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement -- as well as their interpretation. Case studies will be used to deepen students’ understanding of the impact of accounting decisions, and online supplementary material will allow students to apply learned knowledge and practice their skills. Differences between the U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) will be addressed where appropriate.

Text: Introduction to Financial Accounting, 11th Edition (Pearson)

Department Chair

US History & Social Studies Paths